sabbia gallery

Australian Studio Glass & Ceramics

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Julie Bartholomew, Anthropogenic Scrolls, 2018, thrown porcelain and cast glass, Tallest H 128cm

Main Gallery   21 November - 15 December 2018

Anthropogenic Scrolls: transparency and disclosure

Sabbia Gallery is pleased to present this solo exhibition by ceramic artist Julie Bartholomew.

Julie Bartholomew is an artist and educator in ceramics, currently Head Ceramics Workshop, School of Art & Design, ANU. Through her ceramics practice, Julie explores contemporary issues including consumer culture and currently environmentalism with a focus on climate change and its impact on the Antarctic.

Julie was awarded a Doctorate of Visual Arts (Sculpture) from UNSW Art & Design. She has been the recipient of numerous awards including four Australia Council for the Arts New Work Grants, the Tokyo Studio Residency, Australia-China Council Red Gate Residency in Beijing and the Asialink Taiwan Residency. Julie was the winner of the International Gold Coast Ceramics Award in 2006. Her work is held in significant public collections including the Shepparton Art Museum, Wollongong City Gallery, Manly Art Gallery, National Gallery of Australia and the Yingge Ceramics Museum in Taiwan.

‘Anthropogenic Scrolls: transparency and disclosure’ is a response to climate change and its impact on the Antarctic. A new series of ceramic and glass objects depict ice cores embedded with information akin to ancient scrolls. The horizontal striations, created by layers of snowfall, provide an understanding of anthropogenic changes to the earth over thousands of years. Coloured glaze markings describe scientific data collected from actual ice cores extracted from glaciers in the Australian Antarctic Territories. The range of colours capture the hues, tones and shades of glaciers, ice beds and atmospheric effects of the Antarctica. The translucent, material qualities of glass and ceramics make visible evidence of climate change hidden within the glaciers and ice beds of Antarctica.
Dr Julie Bartholomew, October 2018