sabbia gallery

Ceramics, Glass + Fibre

Main Gallery   10 December 2021 - 29 January 2022

Together we tell our stories 2021 : Indigenous Glass, Ceramics, Fibre + Sculpture

Sabbia Gallery is pleased to present the newest addition to its schedule, the biannual Indigenous exhibition series TOGETHER. The second exhibition in the series, TOGETHER we tell our stories 2021, showcases contemporary artworks in ceramics, glass, fibre and works on canvas that have been created by both highly established and emerging Indigenous artists across Australia. The exhibition presents artwork representative of the artist’s connection to Country and as a strong medium for their own individual story telling. This group exhibition brings together new artwork by selected artists, including those working in ceramics from Hermannsburg Potters and Tiwi Design, fibre from Maningrida Arts and Culture, and glass and works on canvas from Ninuku Arts. Each artist is looking back at traditions for inspiration, whilst at the same time looking forward, creating extraordinary pieces across these diverse artistic mediums, and as contemporary artists are further developing their own studio practice. DOROTHY BUNIBUNI CASSARIA YOUNG HOGAN JUDITH PUNGARTA INKAMALA SAMANTHA MALKUDJA DOREEN JINGGARRABARRA OLSEN JOCK PUAUTJIMI RONA PANANGKA RUBUNTJA NYANU WATSON

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Gallery Two   10 December 2021 - 29 January 2022

Tjunkaya Tapaya OAM – Kungkarangkalpa: Seven Sisters

We are pleased to present this important series of ceramics pieces by Tjunkaya Tapaya OAM, alongside her works on paper, as part of the Together we tell our stories bi-annual Indigenous exhibition series. Tjunkaya grew up at the Ernabella Mission. In mission days, the building which is now the art centre was originally used as a food hall by the missionaries. In 1948 it became the Craft Room, where the first work was by women, spinning wool and rug making. Most of the senior artists painting on the APY Lands today have passed through this building across more than one of its incarnations. Tjunkaya began work in the Craft Room making weavings, later excelling in the medium of batik, and became one of the outstanding artists with work in several public collections. Her work was featured on the cover of Judith Ryan’s ‘Across the Desert: Aboriginal Batik from Central Australia.’ Tjunkaya also works in ceramics, tjanpi, punu, print making, spinning and mukata making and her work in these mediums has been seen in numerous exhibitions in Australia and internationally since 1971, in public and private galleries. Her works are held in many national and international collections, including the National Museum of Scotland, National Museum of Australia, National Gallery of Australia and the Museum of Ethnology, Osaka. She was the Deputy Chair of the art centre and the leader of the Nintintjaku Project, an inter-generational teaching project working with Ernabella Anangu School and the Ernabella NPY youth team. She has also recently recommenced work in the ceramics studio, exhibiting ceramics again for the first time in a number of years. Tjunkaya is also a prolific writer in Pitjantjatjara. She is currently developing a bi-lingual children’s book. She also has essays published in a number of exhibition catalogues, including the Desert Mob 2017 catalogue and the catalogue for the 2017 Tarnanthi: Festival of Contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art. In 2016 Tjunkaya took part in a collaborative project, a tjanpi (woven) sculpture called Minyma Tjirilyanya Ngaltujara Pikatjara (Echidna Woman Hurt and Sick). This tells an ancient story of the Echidna Woman. This work was listed as a finalist in the Naonal Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Award. In 2018 Tjunkaya’s life’s work as a representative for her people, an artist and a writer was recognised and she received the Gladys Elphick Award for Lifetime Achievement. In 2020 Tjunkaya was awarded an Order of Australia, General Division in the Queen’s Birthday Honours.

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Gallery Two   10 December 2021 - 29 January 2022

Lynette Lewis + Jayanna Andy – Family: Walytja-piti

Sabbia Gallery has represented Lynette Lewis for several years and we are delighted to host, as part of our biannual Indigenous exhibition series, Together we tell our stories 2021, a duo exhibition featuring Lynette and her daughter Jayanna Andy. Jayanna shows great promise and is following in the footsteps of her mother, telling her stories in her own voice. Referencing the telling of stories in sand (milpatjunanyi), the sgraffito technique of scratching into the surface of the ceramic form is ideal for creating the marks of the artist in their own style. I was twelve years old when my father and my mother took me to my father’s country, Makiri, to collect tjala (honey ants). My father told me the Dreaming story of how the tjala came from Papunya, through Amata and then to Makiri and that’s where they made their home. There are holes in the rock, like rock holes, that were made by the tjala in the dreamtime. My father has passed away and Makiri is a place for men’s business only. I still go out with my family in the country around Ernabella to collect tjala after the rains when the ground is soft, the black ones are the best. Makiri is desert country like Wamikata. Wamikata is a big red sand dune near Ernabella. We go there to collect maku (witchetty grubs) and tjanpi (grass) for weaving. It’s also a place for teaching milpatjunanyi (telling stories in the sand) to children. Lynette Lewis, 2021 My grandmother Atipalku paints her father’s Dreaming on canvas. It is Mulayangu tjukurpa (story). Two years ago I went to that country with my mother Lynette and my grandmother Atipalku and we camped there. Atipalku told us the story of the wanampi (water snake) that lives there. I am also telling my great grandfather’s story on ceramics. It’s the same story that Atipalku is painting, but I’m making the waterholes. These are the rock holes where the wanampi lives. Jayanna Andy, 2021

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